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Ashwin Kaja

With over a decade of experience in China, Ashwin Kaja helps multinational companies, governments, and other clients understand and navigate the complex legal and policy landscape in the country. He plays a leading role in Covington’s China international trade and public policy practices and, outside of Covington, serves as the General Counsel of the American Chamber of Commerce in China.

Ashwin helps clients solve acute problems that arise in the course of doing business in China and position themselves for longer-term success in the country’s rapidly evolving legal and policy environment. He is an expert on Chinese industrial policy and has worked on matters related to a wide range of sectors including technology, financial services, life sciences, and the social sector. Ashwin has also counseled a range of clients on data privacy and cybersecurity-related matters.

As the General Counsel of the American Chamber of Commerce in China (AmCham China), Ashwin serves as a senior officer of the organization and as an ex officio member of its Board of Governors, supporting nearly one thousand member companies in developing their businesses in China and advocating for their needs with China’s central and local governments.

On Sunday, Premier Li Keqiang kicked off this year’s session of the National People’s Congress (which together with the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference make up the “Two Sessions”) by delivering the annual government work report, described by some as China’s version of the State of the Union address. The report is noteworthy

Friday marked the official start of China’s “Two Sessions,” shorthand for the annual parallel meetings in Beijing of the National People’s Congress (“NPC”) and the Chinese People’s Consultative Conference (“CPPCC”).

Beginning on March 3rd and 5th, respectively, the CPPCC and NPC bring over 3,000 government officials, as well as scores of business

On October 31, the Xinhua news agency reported that the Standing Committee of China’s National People’s Congress (“NPC”) is conducting the third reading of the draft Cybersecurity Law (“the Law”). NPC released two previous drafts of the Law for public comment in July 2015 and July 2016 (see Covington e-alerts here and here), but

In May, we wrote about China’s new Charity Law (official Chinese version available here; unofficial English translation available here) and its establishment of a comprehensive framework for revamping the government’s management of the social sector. For decades, charities, social organizations, and civil society groups have operated in a quasi-legal environment where enforcement has

Against the backdrop of a long string of product safety scandals that have eroded public trust, and a desire to transition China’s economy from an export-driven model to a consumption-driven model, the Chinese government continues to enhance its legal framework for the protection of consumer rights. On August 5, China’s State Administration of Industry and

In Part I of this two-part series published on May 12, we described China’s new Charity Law and its implications for charitable organizations operating in the country, both domestic and foreign. On April 28, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress enacted another new law, this one governing foreign non-governmental organizations (“NGOs”) operating in

In recent years, the business community in China has been abuzz with talk of various market access “negative lists” — lists of exceptions to what would otherwise be open market access. China has now introduced a new market access negative list for all forms of investment in the country, both domestic and foreign. Before describing

On December 27, 2015, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPC), China’s top legislative body, enacted a Counter-Terrorism Law (see the Chinese version here), which took effect on January 1, 2016. The adoption of this law, a year after the first draft was released for public comment, followed closely the adoption of a

When China sneezes, does all of Africa catch a cold? Slower Chinese growth and a recently devalued currency will certainly impact Africa, whose largest trading partner is China. However, the impact of China’s recent currency devaluation will largely depend on country-specific factors.

The Chinese government likely devalued its currency in August in part to combat