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Shara Aranoff helps clients in technology, life sciences, and manufacturing use intellectual property and international trade enforcement tools to compete in U.S. and global markets.

Because labor-related obligations in existing U.S. trade agreements are general and largely hortatory, few enforcement actions have been taken with regard to these obligations. The labor obligations in the Agreement between the United States of America, the United Mexican States and Canada (“USMCA” or “Agreement”), however, are specific and likely to be enforced. In

With the recent plethora of new tariff measures aimed at imports of steel, aluminum, solar panels, aircraft, and a wide array of products from China, tariffs are affecting the bottom lines of American companies in a way not seen in decades.  For importers seeking tariff mitigation options, a window of opportunity has just opened.  In

On April 26, 2017, the U.S.-based solar manufacturer Suniva, Inc. filed a petition for global safeguards with the U.S. International Trade Commission (“ITC”). In particular, Suniva requests the imposition of tariffs on solar cells and the establishment of a minimum price for solar modules imported into the United States. The petition was filed under Section

In a notice published in Friday’s Federal Register, the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC or Commission) has issued interim rules implementing the new miscellaneous tariff bill process mandated by Congress in the American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2016.  The rules create a new pathway for U.S. manufacturers to seek temporary suspension or reduction of

Since President Obama announced the normalization of U.S. relations with Cuba in December of 2014, U.S. businesses have begun to plan for the eventual lifting of U.S. economic sanctions against Cuba.  While the Obama Administration has taken a number of steps to jumpstart interactions between U.S. businesses and the Cuban private sector, including easing travel

Proponents of increased U.S. trade with Cuba rightly point to the potential economic benefits to U.S. exporters, particularly in the food and agriculture sector, from greater trade.  But achieving that potential may take more than the lifting of the U.S. trade embargo with Cuba.  A forthcoming study from the U.S. International Trade Commission promises a

On January 30, 2015, the U.S. International Trade Commission launched a study on the economic effects of current U.S. trade and travel restrictions on U.S. trade with Cuba.  The study was requested in December by then-Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee Senator Ron Wyden in connection with President Obama’s announcement of a change in direction