On October 8, the Russian Duma approved the first reading of a bill that would permit Russian citizens whose property is “unjustly” seized as a result of foreign court decisions to claim compensation from Russia’s treasury.  The bill further authorizes the Russian government to recoup the loss by seizing the property of the foreign state

The stand-off between Kiev and Moscow over Russia’s offer of humanitarian aid for civilians caught in the besieged cities of Donetsk and Luhansk is the latest episode in a slow-burning crisis that continues to threaten to erupt into a broader conflict.  The Ukrainian government is understandably wary of allowing onto its territory a convoy of

On July 29, the EU and United States took coordinated steps to expand sanctions targeting the Russian financial services, energy, and defense sectors, including restrictions on energy-related exports to Russia.  The EU also took steps to limit certain types of trade and investment in Crimea, while both the EU and United States identified additional parties

On July 16, 2014, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) imposed an additional wave of sanctions against Russian entities in the financial, energy, and defense sectors.  OFAC established a new Sectoral Sanctions Identifications List (the “SSI List”), which identifies two Russian financial institutions and two Russian energy companies for targeted sanctions. 

For companies concerned about further Russia sanctions, May 25 is critical.  That is the date of elections in Ukraine.  If those elections do not take place or if they are disrupted in the eastern part of the country, it is likely the United States would impose much stronger sanctions.

 To date, sanctions have had a